1-800-MEDIGAP jeff.cline@me.com

Many people get confused about Medigap plans.MostOf the confusion comes aroundThe difference between Medicare supplements and Medicare advantage plans. If you have one of the dates below market on your calendarIt’s probably becauseYou’re thinking about a Medicare advantage planOr you want to change your Medicare advantage plan, Because on her around Each year starts what’s known as the annual election. For those on Medicare advantage plans. Medicare advantage Of Medigap plan but most people think of Medicare supplements when they’re talking about Medigap which is a private insurance that covers the gap between what Medicare part a and Medicare part B pain and your overall expenses, Or what you pay.

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Medicare supplements

These are the Medigap plan but most people think of Medicare supplements when they’re talking about Medigap which is a private insurance that covers the gap between what Medicare part a and Medicare part B pain and your overall expenses, Or what you pay.

Time Sensitive items you need to know regarding your Medicare and Medigap options

What’s the Part A late enrollment penalty? If you aren’t eligible for premium-free Part A, and you don’t buy it when you’re first eligible, your monthly premium may go up 10%. You’ll have to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you could’ve had Part A, but didn’t sign up. 

When to buy a Medigap Plan

The best time to buy a Medigap policy is during your Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This 6-month period begins on the first day of the month in which you’re 65 or older and enrolled in Part B. (Some states have additional Open Enrollment Periods.) After this enrollment period, you may not be able to buy a Medigap policy. If you’re able to buy one, it may cost more. ■ If you delay enrolling in Part B because you have group health coverage based on your (or your spouse’s) current employment, your Medigap Open Enrollment Period won’t start until you sign up for Part B. ■ Federal law generally doesn’t require insurance companies to sell Medigap policies to people under 65. If you’re under 65, you might not be able to buy the Medigap policy you want, or any Medigap policy, until you turn 65. However, some states require Medigap insurance companies to sell Medigap policies to people under 65. 

When can I join, switch, or drop a Medicare drug plan?

■ When you first become eligible for Medicare, you can join during your Initial Enrollment Period. See page 23. ■ If you get Part B for the first time during the General Enrollment Period, you can also join a Medicare drug plan. See page 24. ■ During Open Enrollment, between October 15–December 7 each year. Your coverage begins on January 1 of the following year, as long as the plan gets your request during Open Enrollment. ■ At any time if you qualify for Extra Help. See pages 97–99. Guide to Medicare hhandbookthe official US MEDICARE GUIDE

What if I need help paying my Medicare prescription drug costs? 

If you have limited income and resources, you may qualify for help to pay for some health care and prescription drug costs. Note: Extra Help isn’t available in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, or American Samoa. See page 102 for information about programs that are available in those areas. Extra Help is a Medicare program to help people with limited income and resources pay Medicare prescription drug costs. You may qualify for Extra Help if your yearly income and resources are below these limits in 2016: ■ Single person—income less than $17,820 and resources less than $13,640 per year ■ Married person living with a spouse and no other dependents—income less than $24,030 and resources less than $27,250 per year These amounts may change in 2017. You may qualify even if you have a higher income

Important to know items!

Coinsurance—An amount you may be required to pay as your share of the cost for services after you pay any deductibles. Coinsurance is usually a percentage (for example, 20%). 

Deductible—The amount you must pay for health care or prescriptions before Original Medicare, your prescription drug plan, or your other insurance begins to pay. 

Medicare plan—Any way other than Original Medicare that you can get your Medicare health or prescription drug coverage. This term includes all Medicare health plans and Medicare Prescription Drug Plans.

Premium—The periodic payment to Medicare, an insurance company, or a health care plan for health or prescription drug coverage. 

Service area—A geographic area where a health insurance plan accepts members if it limits membership based on where people live. For plans that limit which doctors and hospitals you may use, it’s also generally the area where you can get routine (non-emergency) services. The plan may disenroll you if you move out of the plan’s service area.

Skilled nursing facility (SNF) care—Skilled nursing care and rehabilitation services provided on a continuous, daily basis, in a skilled nursing facility. Examples of SNF care include physical therapy or intravenous injections that can only be given by a registered nurse or doctor. 

Employer or union health coverage—Health coverage from your, your spouse’s, or other family member’s current or former employer or union. If you have prescription drug coverage based on your current or previous employment, your employer or union will notify you each year to let you know if your prescription drug coverage is creditable. Keep the information you get. Call your benefits administrator for more information before making any changes to your coverage. Note: If you join a Medicare drug plan, you, your spouse, or your dependents may lose your employer or union health coverage. 

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